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Norman Woolworth

Recent Posts

The Most Expensive Medical Procedures, Part 2

High costs have become emblematic of the American healthcare system. From compensating surgeons for long, complex procedures to fees for tests and administrative processes to the cost of simply staying overnight in a hospital, it’s not hard to rack up a heart-stopping bill, especially if a patient requires intensive medical care. As a healthcare provider, you may have seen for yourself how many people will delay or refuse care because of the expense. A fair, reliable health credit service like the Epic River Patient Lending program can give you the opportunity to help your patients stay healthy, both physically and financially.
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The Most Expensive Medical Procedures, Part 1

Healthcare in the U.S. is expensive — we all know that. We put a high premium on the time, effort, and skill of doctors, nurses, and administrators, and time spent in the hospital can quickly lead to a big bill. As a healthcare provider, you have dedicated your career to helping your patients, and with the right programs and partnerships, you can now extend the “do no harm” principle to your patients’ finances as well as their physical health. The Epic River Patient Lending program is made to benefit providers and patients alike with easy, low-interest loans and user-friendly software.
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Healthcare Price Transparency and its Effects on Your Business

Healthcare price transparency laws have become increasingly popular in the U.S. Indeed, 29 states currently have at least one law on the books related to healthcare providers detailing costs. There is also a growing surge of bipartisan support for more, and better, details to help patients determine value, not to mention the fact that CMS requirement for hospitals to publish a list of charges online will go live on January 1.
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Health Insurance Terms to Know

Healthcare providers are increasingly being called upon to help patients navigate complicated insurance terms and service costs, especially those who work in independent practices. The difficulty of handling these aspects of health insurance – or the difficulty of pursuing medical care without it – are among the reasons why many patients avoid paying their bills. To help you and your patients better navigate the labyrinth of insurance terms, today’s blog is dedicated to the explanation of a few common health insurance terms.
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Thank you, but I'll pass on that important medical procedure.

on Feb 20, 2018 10:26:04 AM By | Norman Woolworth | 0 Comments | News
We have all had some visibility to the effects of the high-deductible health plans (HDHP); however, I'm not sure how many people predicted the behavior that many medical providers are seeing from their patients. In an article published in The New York Times, the study described numerous interviews with patients that indicated they had to make difficult decisions to put off care because of the cost for which they were now responsible. Here is one of the more shocking examples:
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Can Technology Improve Patient Treatment?

on Nov 24, 2014 9:27:42 AM By | Norman Woolworth | 0 Comments | News
In a recent Wired magazine article, "Gadgets Like Fitbit Are Remaking How Doctors Treat You," I was reminded of the quote from the TV show House.   The lead character in the show, Dr. Gregory House, M.D., is portrayed as a genius of diagnostic medicine who frequently quips, "Everybody lies."  He is generally referring to patients who are being asked difficult personal questions, but the Wired article caused me to consider if that was true about patients in general.  For example, do patients listen when a doctor prescribes rest?  Does the patient know if they're lying?  Is one man's "rest" the same as another?  Could activity trackers and heart rate monitors really provide accurate data to the doctors?  Could this data be reviewed by the doctor and eliminate follow-up appointments?  Does the combination of a sensor-laden super-computer in our pocket and an activity tracker on our wrist allow us to provide real information to our doctors?
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